Tag Archives: The Cove

Cove Bible Verse for the Week of April 16th

The Lord Is My Rock and My Fortress

Our Bible verse for the week is from Psalm 18:1-3

“I love you, O Lord, my strength. The Lord is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer, my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.  I call upon the Lord, who is worthy to be praised, and I am saved from my enemies. ”


 

 

 

Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts, and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference, retreat or ministry event?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer GardenClick here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.


 

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Prayer Note: April 2018

We hope you will enjoy our “Prayer Note”—an internal communication here at The Cove, created each month to remind and encourage our staff to pray. We share these with you at the beginning of each month in hopes that you, too, will be encouraged.

Prayer Note(3)

JUST WHO DO WE THINK WE’RE TALKING TO?

“…in Jesus’ name, amen.” We often end our prayers in this way—probably more times than we can count. But what do we do after our petitions have been made and our prayers ended? After saying amen, have you ever raised your head, risen from your knees and stooped right back down to pick up your burden?


The little girl stood with tiny feet planted in the cool, wet sand. A strong, salty breeze blew and the hot sun warmed her skin. Not yet old enough to comprehend the immensity of the vast ocean before her, she busied herself with the task of collecting water in her little red pail. With patient determination she squatted low and tipped the bucket down to allow the incoming wave to fill it. Then, squealing with excitement, up she jumped, grinning as she ran, cool seawater splashing over the sides of the bucket as she scampered across the sandy shore. Her parents watched, amused at the seriousness with which their little one viewed this endeavor. The tiny water-bearer grinned up at them as she dumped the seawater into the hole she’d dug earlier. She watched with a mixture of fascination and exasperation as the thirsty ground drank up most of her offering. Then, shrugging her shoulders she rose and ran back down to the shoreline for another fill-up. With sober determination she knelt and tipped the bucket down to allow the next wave to fill it. Satisfied, she lifted her head, scanning the huge incoming waves with wide eyes and an expression of surprise. “Mama,” she cried, “it just keeps on coming!” Then she lifted her half-filled bucket and began making her way back across the sandy beach…

How often my prayer life resembles the activity of this industrious child on her first trip to the beach. I bow my head and dutifully tilt my bucket of need, prepared to catch the incoming flow of blessings I’ve requested of my Father on behalf of myself and those I love. After pouring out praise and petitions, I rise and think the ‘task’ of prayer is complete. Another item checked off my list. Yet often the depth of need seems to remain or grow bigger. Worry and anxiety return to keep me company. I’ve poured out my bucket of prayers, yet the burden still weighs heavy and the depth of my need increases.

LIFTING OUR EYES

What if, instead of keeping my head lowered and my eyes on my tiny bucket, I simply lifted my eyes to survey the vast ocean of grace and goodness in front of me?

What if when we prayed, we paused with each request to consider Who it is we are coming to? How might our prayers change if we began to try to comprehend just a fraction of the limitless sea of sufficiency we have in Christ? Would it help us to pray without ceasing if we paused to remind ourselves that His mercies never cease?  (See 1 Thessalonians 5:17 and Lamentations 3:22.)

“Lord, there’s a big decision I have to make—please give me wisdom. Your Word says that You Yourself are the embodiment of Wisdom, and that in You ‘are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge’ (Colossians 2:3, NKJV). You’ve told me to ask for wisdom when I need it (see James 1:5), so I’m asking now. Thank You for hearing and answering, Lord!”

“Jesus, I’ve blown it again. I’ve failed You and fallen into the same hateful sin. I confess it before You and ask You to forgive me. You are the Savior who died to pay the penalty for my sin, and You are my Redeemer and Deliverer. (See Colossians 1:13-14.) Thank You that nothing in all creation can separate me from Your love.” (See Romans 8:38-39.)

“God, I’m facing a huge task and I’m in need of strength. Your Word tells me that You are my ‘refuge and fortress’ (Psalm 91:2, ESV).  You are omnipotent—all-powerful, and You give strength to the weary and power to the weak. (See Isaiah 40:29.)  I need Your strength and power today, and I’m trusting You for it. Thank you.”

“Lord Jesus, these waves of grief and loss washing over me threaten to knock me off my feet. The Scriptures tell me that you were ‘a Man of sorrows and acquainted with grief’ (Isaiah 53:3, NKJV) and that You are ‘near to the broken-hearted’ (Psalm 34:18, ESV). Please help me as I bring these pieces of my shattered heart to You. Let me rest in You, trusting You to hold me and bring comfort, courage and healing.”

“Heavenly Father, the need I’m faced with appears huge—insurmountable—like a towering mountain casting a great shadow over me. Yet I thank You that I can ‘seek refuge in the shadow of Your wings’ (Psalm 57:1, HCSB).  Help me to remember that You are the all-sufficient Creator who holds all things together. (See Colossians 1:16-17.) As I lift my eyes to the hills, help me to remember that my help comes from You, the Maker of heaven and earth. (See Psalm 121:1-3.)”

As we pray for the seminars and events that will take place at The Cove this month, let’s search the Scriptures, claim God’s promises, and pause to remember just Who it is we are talking to.

“For this reason I bow my knees before the Father,  from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named, that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith—that you, being rooted and grounded in love, may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.
(Ephesians 3:14-19 NKJV)

Keep praying and seeking!

—Donna Riesen


We appreciate you joining us in prayer for the following events taking place on The Cove property during the month of April:

Jan Harrison — April 8
(Emcee: Michelle Bachelor; Worship Leader: Shannon Wexelberg)
Women’s Spring Luncheon —
Life After the Storm: God Will Carry You Through

SeniorSalt Impact Hymn Sing — April 9
(Emcee/Worship Leader: Ron Whittemore)

Jim Cymbala — April 10-11
(Emcee: Glynn Bachelor; Worship Leader: Shannon Wexelberg)
Pastor Renewal Retreat—
Breakthrough Ministry: Lessons From the Book of Acts

Guided Personal Spiritual Retreat — April 16-19
(Facilitator: John Parrish)

An Evening at The Cove with David Phelps — April 19
(Emcee: Michelle Bachelor)

 

Special Easter Message from Will Graham

“What then shall I do with Jesus?”

By: Will Graham

For Christians, Easter is one of the most holy times of the year. With all that surrounds the holiday from a worldly perspective,  I find that many people simply miss the point of why we rejoice. Easter exists because Jesus died for our sins and conquered the grave. We celebrate life at Easter, because death lost its sting with Christ’s triumphant resurrection.

Sadly, so many of our family, friends and neighbors enjoy Easter, but have never experienced the true meaning of it. They may know of Jesus and what He accomplished on the cross, but they can’t or won’t make a decision about Him as their Savior.

In the Bible, we see a man who will forever be linked to what we call Easter. He talked to Jesus directly, he evaluated him, and yet he too, couldn’t bring himself to make a decision about what to do with Christ. His name was Pontius Pilate and Matthew 27:11-25 tells us a lot about this Roman Governor who oversaw the trial of Jesus.

First, Pilate rejected Jesus’ own confession of who He was: the Christ, the Savior. Pilate asked the question and heard the truth (straight from the mouth of the Son of God), but he took it no further.

Second, Pilate rejected clear evidence. Pilate investigated Jesus and came to the conclusion that He was innocent, finding that He had committed no crime. Pilate realized that the only reason Jesus was on trial was the envy and hatred of the religious leaders, but he rejected that truth.

Third, Pilate gave in to pressure. Though he heard the claims of Christ and knew He had done nothing wrong, Pilate was compelled to sentence an innocent man to death because of the influence of the crowd.

Finally, Pilate tried to cleanse himself from the death of Jesus. He knew that he had just condemned an innocent man to die, and he was responsible. In a symbolic gesture, he washed his hands and proclaimed the guilt for Christ’s death on the crowd instead.

My friends, Pilate had a decision to make. He knew the truth, but he couldn’t take a stand one way or the other. Instead, he asked a question: “What then shall I do with Jesus who is called Christ?” (Matthew 27:22, NKJV)

That’s the question that so many today, perhaps even you, have a hard time answering. In far too many situations, people know the truth but – like Pilate – they give in to the pressures of others and walk away from Jesus, putting the decision off for another day.

However, indecision is a decision. Making no decision for Christ, is making a decision about Christ. And it’s one that has eternal consequences.

If you have been putting off the decision to follow Christ and make Him the Lord of your life, now is the perfect time. Jesus’ death and resurrection, which we celebrate as Easter, paved the way for you. I encourage you to receive that hope and accept Him as your Savior today!


To learn more on how to have a relationship with Jesus Christ and to have Peace with God, click here. 


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts, and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference, retreat or ministry event?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer GardenClick here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

Follow us on social media. click map

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Kendra Graham Online Bible Study: Mark 15:39

Welcome to Kendra Graham’s Online Bible Study! This is a place where we can come together and share in our journey towards Scriptural truths and spiritual maturity. We pray this will be a safe, respectful, resourceful place to come and discuss God’s Word…to discover What it says…What it means…and What it means to you!Make sure you don’t miss a post, just enter your email in the “Subscribe Via Email” box in the upper left-hand corner of our blog. It’s free and you’ll receive these posts straight into your email inbox.

KENDRA GRAHAM NOTES FROM Mark 15:39

A Triumphal Entry

And when the centurion, who was standing right in front of Him saw the way He breathed His last, he said, “Truly this man was the Son of God!”

What Does it Say:
The Centurion standing right in front of Him saw the way He breathed His last, he said, “Truly this man was the Son of God”

What Does it Mean:
The book of Mark goes through the narrative of the crucifixion in a unique way.  Recently I was reading, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire by Nigel Rodgers and was pretty amazed by what I read.

Romans had what was called a “Triumph”.  A triumph started probably back in the days of the Greeks, but Octavian, Caesar Augustus made the honor of triumphs for emperors of Rome only.  When Rome would win a major battle, there would be a huge parade, celebration in the street which would parade the captives of that particular battle in front as proof of his accomplishment and then the emperor, “humbly” behind.

The triumphator, the emperor, would be taken into the place of the palace called the Praetorium, where the Praetorium guard of Rome would be.  The elite soldiers would take a special sash called a toga picta, which symbolized, and drew the connection between the emperor and one of their Roman gods, like Zeus, Mars or Jupiter.  The emperors since Octavian were known as the “sons of the gods” and these triumphs would remind the people of that very thing.  The Praetorian Guard was the closest thing to the emperor so they would of course know the deity of the emperor more intimately than anyone, so for them to dress the emperor was a very important part of the triumphal process.  The emperors would often pay off the Praetorian Guard, so that they would really make a convincing show of this whole process.  The soldiers would place a crown of laurel upon the head of the emperor.  The emperor would begin the processional in the field of Mars  (Campus Martinus) and proceed down the sacred way to Capitoline Hill (the place of the skull where tradition has it that as the Romans were building their city, a full in tact human head was found here).  At Capitoline Hill the captives were either killed or they were set free depending on the rule of the emperor.  The Roman guard would go before the emperor on this journey and would exclaim to the crowd, “HAIL! The son of god!  HAIL, the son of god!”  The crowd would cheer and bow as the emperor passed. Lastly the emperor would ascend up the steps of the temple of Saturn with one man on either side.   One man would tell him that he is the son of god and the other would remind him that he is mortal.  The emperor at the top of the steps would be offered a goblet of wine, which he would pour out on the ground as an offering to the gods and to Rome signifying that the emperor would give his life blood for the gods and Rome. The crowd would cheer.  An animal would be sacrificed there, at that place to satisfy the payment to the gods in thanks in adoration for the victory and power that Rome enjoyed.  The city would feast the rest of the day.


(Picture:  Golgotha, where Jesus was crucified)

Now, read Mark chapter 15.  How would the disciples explain to the Roman world the triumph of the Savior, Jesus, to a pagan world who did not know the Word of God and were not looking for a Messiah?  Through the triumphal procession of Jesus.  The similarities cannot be ignored.  Mark 15:16, the soldiers took Him, Jesus into the Praetorium and dressed him in a fine kingly toga picta of purple and fashioned for Him a crown, not of laurel but of thorns.  They put it on Him.  The guard went before him on a procession (Mark 15:18) and exclaimed, “Hail! King of the Jews!” They led Him out of the palace and through the city, to crucify Him.  They brought Him to a place called , Golgotha, translated “The place of the skull” (Mark 15:22).  Jesus wound through the city along the way called the “Via dolorosa” which means the way of suffering and is seen today as “the sacred way” as many this Easter will make their pilgrimage down the same way.  The soldiers offered Jesus wine mixed with myrrh, Mark 15:23, but He would not drink it.  The guards continued their mocking and jeering in the face of the son of God who was not just symbolizing that He would pour His life blood out for His people the Jews and the world, but He was doing it (John 10:17-18).   He was crucified between two thieves.  One thief proclaimed, (Luke 23:39) “Are You not the Christ save yourself and us!” The other thief asked Jesus to “Remember me when you come into your kingdom” (Luke 23:42).


(Picture: Golgotha, where Jesus was crucified)

All this was taken in by the Roman Praetorian Guard in Jerusalem.  This particular centurion soldier at the cross saw Jesus as the undeniable Son of God.  How many times had that soldier been a part of Roman triumphs?  How many times was he forced to bend his knee to the emperor exclaiming that the emperor was the son of god?  How often had he been paid off by the Roman authorities to pronounce the deity of the Roman leader?  Yet here, in front of the cross, this man proclaimed without payment or force, “Truly this man was the Son of God”.  He had seen so many imposters, that here, at the cross, the Truth of Jesus was seen.  Even the Roman world would be able to see, understand and believe that Jesus is the Christ, the son of the living God (Matthew 16:16).

Do you see similarities to that of a Roman triumph?  Truly this was the ultimate triumph.  The triumph once and for all for sin.  Jesus triumphed at the place of the skull.  Jesus triumphed over sin at the cross and three days later rose again and triumphed over death at the grave.  The cross is not a defeat, but the greatest triumph that the world will ever see.

Many of us have seen failures of men who claim to be next to God.  We have seen failures of leaders who preach the Word the God.  We have seen failures of godly men and women who have fallen to adversity in this world.  We have seen failures of the church.  We have seen failures in Christian schools and universities.  We have seen failures in Christian organizations.  It is so easy to focus on all those who have fallen, but truly isn’t that just proof of the reason and desperate need of the world for Jesus?  This Easter, let’s join the centurion at the cross standing in front of Jesus alone.  As we look to Jesus this Easter may our words ring ever so similar to that centurion as we proclaim, “Truly, this is the Son of God!”.

What does it Mean to me?

Who do you say Jesus is?  Everyone must decide about Jesus.  This Easter will you make that choice to cry out to Jesus who alone is able to forgive and redeem your sin? (Acts 16:31, Romans 3:23, Romans 6:33, Romans 5:8, I Corinthians 15:3-4)

When have you truly taken the time to see Jesus for who He has proven Himself to be?

LIVE IT OUT.

Dear God, I am a sinner and I ask for Your forgiveness. I believe Jesus Christ is Your Son. I believe that He died for my sin and that you raised Him to life. I want to trust Him as my Savior and follow Him as Lord, from this day forward. Guide my life and help me to do your will. I pray this in the name of Jesus. Amen.”

Daily read the Word of God and get to know the love this God has for you since before time began.


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts, and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference, retreat or ministry event?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer GardenClick here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

Follow us on social media. click map

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Ten Life-Changing Lessons Billy Graham Taught Ron Hutchcraft

Today we are sharing a reflection from The Cove speaker Ron Hutchcraft on life lessons Billy Graham taught him over the years.

By: Ron Hutchcraft

I was privileged to touch just the edges of Billy Graham’s life. He touched mine all the way to its core. There are many who knew him intimately. What he taught me often came just by watching his life. And sometimes through connections at Billy Graham events where I had the opportunity to speak over the years.

But the Jesus-power and Jesus-presence reflected in Billy Graham’s life radiated far and wide. I probably learned more about a Christ-honoring life from him than any other single person I’ve known. Sometimes you have to see it to be it. In Billy Graham, I got to see it.

Billy Graham has left some priceless lessons as a legacy in my life. By embodying some powerful principles of a Christ-honoring life.

  1. Never encumber the Gospel.

Serving as chairman of the 1991 Northern New Jersey Crusade, I saw reporters relentlessly trying to get a Billy Graham quote on the hot button issues of the day. He never would go there. In one press conference, pursued by politically divisive issues, he smiled and said, “Back home in the mountains, we have lot of kinds of birds. But I’ve noticed one thing about all of them—they all have a right wing and a left wing. And it takes both left and right for them to fly.” A knowing smile. Then back to Jesus.

You could not get Billy off on a detour—not political, not theological, not religious, not cultural. Appropriately, this evangelist, who had once wanted to be a baseball player, always kept his eye on the ball. The Gospel. Unedited. Unencumbered. Uncompromised.

  1. Be all about Jesus.

It didn’t matter where you put him—a Larry King interview, The Tonight Show, a press conference, commenting on a natural disaster, speaking to the nation after the attacks of September 11, 2001. With wit and charm and warmth, Billy Graham would always bring it back to Jesus and His cross. Because that’s the only message that can enable a person to “cross over from death to life” (John 5:24). And because we are called to “make the most of every opportunity” (Ephesians 5:16) to tell about Jesus.

  1. Always make it about others, not about you.

Any time I was with Billy Graham personally, he just wanted to talk about me, never about himself. He was that way with everyone. No sense of self-importance. He embodied how to “in humility consider others better than yourselves” and how to “do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit” (Philippians 2:3).

  1. Never steal the glory.

“I am the Lord; that is My name! I will not give my glory to another” (Isaiah 42:8). I sometimes joked that Billy must not have gotten the memo about how important he was. He just always seemed amazed that God was using him. The word you keep hearing from people who knew him intimately or just casually is: “humble.” He really was. In a world obsessed with celebrity and stars, Billy Graham refused to be one.

  1. Never compromise your integrity.

It was a stroke of godly brilliance that motivated Billy Graham and his key leaders to commit to what they called their “Modesto Manifesto.” Prayerfully developed in a motel room early in their ministry, it committed them to the high road in everything from how they handled money to avoiding even the appearance of inappropriate behavior with the opposite sex. And for more than half a century, “the integrity of the upright” guided them (Proverbs 11:3). When the wife of a dear friend came to pick him up at the airport, he politely declined because of their rule to never be alone with a woman. Again and again, journalists tried to find financial wrongdoing in Billy Graham’s ministry. Again and again, all they could find was an evangelist who would not get in a position where it would even be possible for him to be out of bounds financially.

  1. Never be afraid to use new things to tell the old, old story.

When radio was new, Billy Graham grabbed it as a Gospel multiplier. When TV was young, Billy Graham began televised crusades. Internet evangelism—he was there with the Gospel. “That by all possible means I might save some” (1 Corinthians 9:23). When Billy became concerned that they weren’t reaching enough young people, he accepted the counsel of younger staff to move from a conventional “youth night” program to a contemporary music concert. Where Billy Graham would speak for just twenty minutes between the Christian bands. The new format—controversial to some—broke venue attendance records and brought amazing harvests.

Two weeks after their first such “concert for the next generation,” I heard him tell about it to a gathering of some 2,000 evangelists, many of whom were quite conservative in their methodologies. He said: “When the first group was playing, I was in my trailer, listening with the printed lyrics they had provided me. And I said to myself, ‘This may not be my style of music, but I recognize this message. This is the Gospel of Christ I’ve been preaching my whole life!'” Billy Graham wasn’t afraid to change the package to reach more people—so long as the Message was Christ’s unchanging Gospel!

  1. What unites us is far greater than what divides us.

I saw the power of that when Billy Graham convened 10,000 evangelists from 200 countries for Amsterdam 2000. Virtually every language, every culture, every denomination imaginable—together under the banner of our crucified and risen Savior. I doubt any other person on earth would have been able to convene such an historic gathering. But Billy Graham knew it was the cross and the resurrection that was the ground on which all true Christians meet. And that’s the ground where he chose to stand his whole life.

  1. Prayer is the deciding factor in any work for God.

When Billy checked with his Crusade directors for a progress report on an upcoming Crusade, his first question was always the same: “Are they praying?” He told us that the three keys to an effective Crusade were as follows: #1—pray; #2—pray; #3—pray! Sometimes associates wondered why he was taking so long to make a ministry decision. The reason was simple: Billy Graham would pray until he had God’s answer.

  1. Be transparent about your shortcomings.

When his relationship with President Nixon compromised his witness for Christ, he openly confessed his mistake and his commitment to never wander into politics again. In explaining one of his main reasons for building the Billy Graham Training Center at The Cove, he expressed his lifetime regret over not having studied the Bible more seriously and deeply when he was younger. We respected him even more because of a humility that wasn’t afraid to say, “I was wrong.”

  1. Share Christ boldly, but always with gentleness and respect (1 Peter 3:15).

At a time when Jesus’ followers are often perceived to be angry and condemning, Billy Graham leaves us a model that builds bridges, not walls. However lost, however hostile a person might be, he always treated them with dignity and respect. And that is probably why so many people from so many backgrounds respected him. And listened to his eternity-deciding Message.

A man who has been one of the most powerful men in Washington shared his memory of meeting Billy Graham. As a young man, this man’s job was to guide Mr. Graham through the passageways of the state Capitol and to the inauguration at which Billy was to speak. It was only a few minutes. Seemingly, nothing very special. But this young leader, who would come to great political power, said: “I know I was just with a human being. But I felt like I was in the presence of the Eternal.”

What more could any follower of Jesus ask than that? To walk so close to Jesus that, when people have been with us, they feel like they’ve been with Him.

Yes, Billy Graham talked with presidents. More importantly, he walked with Jesus. And brought countless millions with Him.

Thank you, Lord Jesus, for this life well-lived. From whom we still have so much to learn.

And as we remember Billy Graham’s life, it’s important that we take a moment to look at the impact of our own life. Not on multitudes, but on the people in our personal world.

Because our mission from Jesus is the same as Billy’s—to be “Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making His appeal through us” (2 Corinthians 5:20).

And our message is the same. God loves you. So much that He sent His Son to do the dying for our sin.

We all know someone who doesn’t know our Jesus. For them, you are God’s chosen messenger. In these turbulent, divisive, disturbing times, you have the Anchor someone close to you desperately needs.

And the life and death of God’s best-known messenger of His love is opening doors and hearts for you to tell them about your Jesus.

This is a moment of opportunity, my brother or sister! Opportunity to help change someone’s eternal destination.

If you’re ever going to tell them about your Jesus, do it now.


Ron Hutchcraft will be speaking at The Cove May  9th-11th. Click Here to Register


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts, and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference, retreat or ministry event?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer GardenClick here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

 

 

Saturday Snapshot– A Look Inside Our Chapel

Have you ever seen the Chatlos Memorial Chapel and Visitors Center at The Cove? There is something so beautiful about walking into a chapel that has so much history to offer! Here are a few pictures from inside our Chapel and Visitors Center this week.

This chapel known as Chatlos Memorial Chapel opened in 1988 and was a gift from the William Chatlos Foundation in Florida. The pews are believed to be 200 years old and are from the Royal School for the Blind founded in London in 1799. The only exception are the last two pews and they were donated from a church in Tennessee.

The pulpit is from The Church of England and is believed to be between 200-400 years old. If only we could hear the messages that were spoken from this pulpit so many years ago.

The top level of the chapel is a prayer room. The prayer table has a lighted globe to remind us to be in prayer for evangelism around the world as it is being carried out by God’s people. “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God which passeth all understanding shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus” – Philippians 4:6-7

The second floor of the chapel is the pictorial display area gallery of Dr. Graham’s ministries around the world! This is also our Visitor Center. Below is one of the powerful photos in this gallery!

Have a blessed week friends!

____________

Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts, and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference, retreat or ministry event?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer GardenClick here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

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Cove Bible Verse for Week of March 6

This week’s verse is brought to you by:
Michelle | Cove Program Manager | Zephaniah 3:17

“The Lord you God in your midst, The mighty One, will save; He will rejoice over you with gladness, He will quiet you with His love, He will rejoice over you with singing,” (Zephaniah 3:17, NKJV). 

SMALL_Michelle_Program Manager


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer Garden.  Click here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

 

Cove Bible Verse for Week of February 27

“They are new every morning; great is your faithfulness,” (Lamentations 3:23, ESV). 

Jeff & Mary | SOWERS (Servants on Wheels Ever Ready) | Lamentations 3:23

SMALL_Jeff and Mary Peace_SOWERS

For information on the SOWER ministry, click here.


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer Garden.  Click here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

Cove Bible Verse for Week of February 20

“God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and a sound mind,” (2 Timothy 1:7, NKJV). 

Sabrina | Guest Group Billing Assistant | 2 Timothy 1:7

SMALL_Sabrina_Guest Group Billing Assistant


Are you a Christian church or non-profit ministry looking for a place to hold your conference or retreat?  Click here for more information on holding your event at The Cove.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer Garden.  Click here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.

Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Cove Bible Verse for Week of February 13

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me,”
(Philippians 4:13, NKJV). 

Renee | Program Assistant | Philippians 4:13SMALL_Renee_Program Assistant


Click here for a schedule of seminar, concerts and retreats at The Cove in beautiful Asheville, NC.

Visit the Chatlos Memorial Chapel, Visitors Center, and Ruth’s Prayer Garden.  Click here for directions and operating hours. Tours are free.